Tuesday, May 12, 2009

The Law Is An Ass


A Florida woman appeared in federal court here today, accused of having pocketed more than $8.5 million from an online prostitution business that employed pornography stars and fashion models.

So this woman sets up a prostitution business for the rich and mighty. Fees ranged from $50,000 a night, and upward, according to the report.

Let me see if I got this right:
If a woman has sex for money, on camera, for the entertainment of the masses, it's all legal and good.
If the same woman has sex for money, in private, then it's a crime.

Where the hell is the moralist's logic on this one?

6 comments:

W.B. Picklesworth said...

They would say that pornography should be illegal as well. I feel torn on this one. I think pornography is a plague on society, damaging men in particular and through them their wives and families; I also think it damages the people involved with the production and there are powers involved (shame and coercion) that enable producers to manipulate participants.)

However, I dislike the idea of the state getting involved because the state gets hung up on power and that's a nasty business too. Ultimately individuals have to answer for it, but in the mean time another generation of boys gets sucked into it and more girls get objectified, exploited and tossed to the curb.

Bike Bubba said...

What Ben says. Prostitution is not a victimless crime, as it rarely occurs without some sort of compulsion, generally involving sexual abuse, drug use, or other crimes against the "girl." It goes both for hardcore porn and "hardcore porn before an audience of one."

Anonymous said...

"If a woman has sex for money, on camera, for the entertainment of the masses, it's all legal and good.
If the same woman has sex for money, in private, then it's a crime.

Where the hell is the moralist's logic on this one?"

That is a very good question.


Baffles the bejeepers out of me.

Again ......great question.

chills

Palm boy said...

...Who is John Galt?

kr said...

WBP said it well.

I suppose the followup question, is when did you start equating morality with the law ;)?

Brian said...

Bubba--the criminalization of prostitution drives the sex trade underground, where the type of abuses you describe more easily flourish.