Thursday, November 25, 2010

On Racial Profiling

When did 'Muslim' become a race?

7 comments:

my name is Amanda said...

There are several religious groups that can be considered ethnoreligious groups. The Jewish people, for example. Although Islam is spread through East and South Asia, Muslims can be described this way as well. This is especially a factor when people express negative attitudes toward Muslims (negative attitudes, otherwise known as racism), because usually they are meaning, people who are specifically from the Middle East, and they are considering them all terrorists.

Gino said...

i asked "When?".

but anyway... if somebody expresses positive attitudes towards muslims, is that racism too?

W.B. Picklesworth said...

"Muslim" as racial group is nonsensical. One cannot use the term this way in any rational kind of way. So then the question becomes, "When did we start using doublespeak?" 1984 sounds about right.

Gino said...

that's pretty racist, itself, WB.

Mr. D said...

A Muslim from Bosnia doesn't look much like a Muslim from Somalia and neither looks much like a Muslim from Indonesia. And a Bosnian looks at the world far differently than a Somali does.

Race isn't especially useful for understanding Islamic terrorists, which isn't surprising considering there are probably a billion Muslims.

kr said...

lots of Muslims in Portland are black not Semetic(?sp) (we have a lot of those too, but mostly African-heritage ones).

I'd say Muslims gained popular "race" status in America right around, oh .... 9/12. When they suddenly became "them" to non-Jewish Americans.

J. Peterson said...

I am going to say when being a Muslim became more important than anything else in their lives like where they were born, where they grew up, where they live, and such.